Archive for July, 2014

Less Democracy–More Women Leaders?

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

The General Synod of the Church of England , after years of debate and failed motions, yesterday passed the final resolution that will allow for the appointment of women bishops. There was cheering and considerable relief, as conservative Anglo-Catholics and Evangelicals voted for legislation that they felt would preserve their freedom to remain separate from the female episcopacy.

Note that I said, “appointment.” In the Church of England, bishops, cathedral deans and canons, and archdeacons are chosen by other bishops or the Prime Minister. There is nothing like the diocesan election system in place in the U.S.

Interestingly, the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church was recently in England, and she was asked about the coming Synod vote. She ventured the opinion that women leadership might advance more rapidly than it has in this country because women could be chosen by a few hierarchs, rather than by various large conventions.

Does this mean that ordinary laypeople and priests are anti-feminist and reactionary? I would hope not. In any case, the next few years in England will certainly be years of change. —J. Douglas Ousley


So Help Us God

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

To no fanfare and precious little interest even among careful observers of national church politics, the Joint Nominating Committee has presented its first “essay” regarding the upcoming election of a new Presiding Bishop.  

The essay doesn’t say much except present a timeline for the nominating process. The real issues will be in the descriptions of the qualities of the ideal PB–and even these could probably be written today: “loves God, strives for peace and justice, nurtures diversity, strong leader” etc.

The only underground gossip seems to surround whether the current Presiding Bishop might seek an unprecedented second nine-year term, as apparently she will be just young enough to do. If she says definitively that she will not run, then expect candidates to come out of the woodwork. If she does run, then there will be lots of interest, because even her biggest supporters are disappointed in the decline of the church in the past eight years of her leadership. —J. Douglas Ousley