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Landmark Building

The first services in the church building were held on December 11, 1864. The architectural style of the church is “Neo-Gothic;” it is best known for the windows and other decorations by great American and English artists of the late Victorian period. Incarnation is a New York City Landmark and has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Church of the Incarnation - New York City Landmark


Open Church Hours

Weekday Lunchtime Monday through Friday
11:30am to 2:00pm

The church is open every weekday from 11:30 am until 2:00 pm.  During this time, visitors may wish to light a candle, enter a prayer request in the guest book, purchase postcards and devotional materials, pray privately or as part of our Wednesday and Friday 12:15 services, or take a self-guided tour of the church using the provided “Guide to the History of the Church.”


Guided Church Tour

The Tour Committee engages visitors in informative tours of the church. Led by parishioners, the tours take individuals and groups through the neo-Gothic building designated as “the Landmark Church of Murray Hill” by the New York Historical Landmarks Commission. Guides are careful to point out Incarnation’s nationally known collection of ecclesiastical art, as well as its importance as a living, breathing church community. Tours are offered after the 11:00 am service on the first Sunday of the month and by appointment. Please call the Parish Office 212-689-6350 for more information.


Murray Hill Neighborhood

The Church of the Incarnation is located in a historic neighborhood named after the Murray family farm that once occupied the area. Today, Murray Hill is a unique residential enclave nestled in mid-town Manhattan, south of Grand Central Terminal, the Chrysler Building and the United Nations and north of the Empire State Building, NYU Medical Center and Kips Bay/Gramercy Park. The Murray Hill neighborhood spans from Fifth Avenue on its western border all the way to the East River.


How to Reach Us

The Church of the Incarnation at 209 Madison Avenue is located on the northeast corner of Madison Avenue and 35th Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City. The main entrance faces Madison Avenue. The Parish house is adjacent to the church building, to the north.

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BY BUS

• The M2, M3, and M4 buses, traveling north on Madison Avenue, stop nearly in front of the Church building.
• The M5, M6, and M7 buses travel north on Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas), two blocks west of the Church.
• The M2, M3, M4, and M5 buses travel south on Fifth Avenue, one block west of the Church.
• The M1, going both north and south, stops on Park Avenue, one block east of the Church.
• Nearby crosstown buses include the M16 and M34 on 34th Street, and the M42 and M104 on 42nd Street.

BY SUBWAY

• The 4, 5, 6 (Lexington Avenue lines) and 7 (Flushing line) stop at Grand Central Station; the 6 (local) stops at 33rd Street and Park Avenue, one block to the east and two blocks to the south of the church.
• The B, D, Q, and the N and R lines stop at the junction of Broadway, Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) and 34th Street at Herald Square, two blocks to the west and one block to the south of the church.

METRO NORTH

Take any line to Grand Central Station. Enter the main waiting area: a large room with a blue ceiling painted to represent constellations, with a round information booth in the center of the room. Walk onto Park Avenue, and head south to 35th Street; make a right toward Madison Avenue.

AMTRAK, NJTRANSIT

Take the line to Penn Station. Exit onto Eight Avenue or 34th Street. Walk east four blocks onto Madison Avenue. Make a left and walk north toward 35th Street. (Note: If preferred, you can take a 34th Street crosstown bus to Madison Avenue.)

BY CAR

On Sunday street parking is available in the area, there are also Parking lots nearby – the closest are at Park Ave. and 36th Street, and on Park Ave. between 34th and 35th Street.



One Response to “Landmark Building”

  1. [...] Daniel Chester French, Henry Hobson Richardson and Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The church’s website includes a virtual tour of the artwork. The Wikipedia entry also contains a list of the artworks [...]